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G.2.2.6 Moon data %[format]?argument special texts

%[format]([*][mode]ISO-6709:1983-co-ordinate[,[+|-]mmmm|hh:[mm]] references the approximate time of moonrise by default,
%[format])[*][mode]ISO-6709:1983-co-ordinate[,[+|-]mmmm|hh:[mm]] references the approximate time of moonset by default,
%[format][[*][mode]ISO-6709:1983-co-ordinate[,[+|-]mmmm|hh:[mm]] references the approximate period of visibility of the Moon (lunar day length) by default,
%[format]][*][mode]ISO-6709:1983-co-ordinate[,[+|-]mmmm|hh:[mm]] references the approximate period of non-visibility of the Moon (lunar night length) by default.

All these special texts can be used for at pleasure any geographic point location, i.e. it is possible to determine different astronomical values for any location on the globe, and that for at pleasure any clocktime with a resolution of a single minute within the period of the years AD 1 until AD 9999, that is respected by Gcal.

The selection which value has to be calculated by these special texts is done by specifying the mode part of the preceding argument. Actually, exactly 61 different modes can be used that are represented by the ‘0...9, ‘a...z and ‘A...Y characters, and which create different kind of results that are depending on the special text used. First of all, here is a table in which all usable modes are described and explained sufficiently. You can also see from this table, which Moon oriented special text or texts are corresponding to which mode, i.e. cause the determination of an astronomical value as it is described in the table:

Mode Special text Description

0 (, ) Calculates the approximate midnight time of the Moon. The astronomical midnight time of the Moon is at that clocktime, when the Moon holds an azimuth (horizontal angular distance between the vertical circle, that passes the Moon, and the North point) of either precisely 0 degrees of precisely 180 degrees, which depends on the season and the geographical location. At that clocktime, the Moon is close its lowest culmination point, i.e. close the lowest point below or above the horizontal plane the Moon transits during this day. Nevertheless, there is exactly one day during a synodic month (or lunation) —i.e. the mean time between two consecutive conjunctions (or New Moon phases)— at which no lunar midnight happens, because the Moon revolves the Earth within 24 hours and 50 minutes on the average — which also means, that the Moon rises on the average 50 minutes later each day.

1 (, ) Calculates the approximate noon time of the Moon. The astronomical noon time of the Moon is at that clocktime, when the Moon holds an azimuth of either precisely 180 degrees of precisely 0 degrees, which depends on the season and the geographical location. At that clocktime, the Moon is close its highest culmination point, i.e. close the highest point above or below the horizontal plane the Moon transits during this day. Nevertheless, there is exactly one day during a synodic month at which no lunar noon happens.

2 ( Calculates the approximate time when the center of the Moon passes a reference altitude which is between about 54 and 61 arcminutes above a mathematical-geocentric horizon before lunar noon time; thus rising. A mathematical horizon is a purely geometrically-built horizon which disregards the phenomenon of refraction as it arises in reality by the influence of the Earth's atmosphere. A geocentrical horizon is the horizontal plane that passes through the Earth's center, orthogonal to the observer's local vertical. In the further context, the shorter term mathematical horizon is used which actually means the mathematical-geocentric horizon. The above mentioned reference altitude is computed from the value of the Moon's parallax as it appear at that clocktime. Nevertheless, there is exactly one day during a synodic month at which no such moonrise happens.

2 ) Calculates the approximate time when the center of the Moon passes a reference altitude which is between about 54 and 61 arcminutes above a mathematical horizon after lunar noon time; thus setting. The above mentioned reference altitude is computed from the value of the Moon's parallax as it appear at that clocktime. Nevertheless, there is exactly one day during a synodic month at which no such moonset happens.

2 [ Calculates the approximate period while the center of the Moon is above a reference altitude which is between about 54 and 61 arcminutes above a mathematical horizon; thus is visible.

2 ] Calculates the approximate period while the center of the Moon is below a reference altitude which is between about 54 and 61 arcminutes above a mathematical horizon; thus is non-visible.

3 ( Calculates the approximate time when the upper limb of the Moon passes a reference altitude which is between about 54 and 61 arcminutes above a mathematical horizon before lunar noon time; thus rising. The above mentioned reference altitude is computed from the respective values of the Moon's semidiameter and Moon's parallax as they appear at that clocktime. If the reference altitude that is referring to the Moon's upper limb is converted to a reference altitude that is referring to the Moon's center, this results in a value which is between about 39 and 44 arcminutes above the geocentric horizon. Nevertheless, there is exactly one day during a synodic month at which no such moonrise happens.

3 ) Calculates the approximate time when the upper limb of the Moon passes a reference altitude which is between about 54 and 61 arcminutes above a mathematical horizon after lunar noon time; thus setting. The above mentioned reference altitude is computed from the respective values of the Moon's semidiameter and Moon's parallax as they appear at that clocktime. Nevertheless, there is exactly one day during a synodic month at which no such moonset happens.

3 [ Calculates the approximate period while the upper limb of the Moon is above a reference altitude which is between about 54 and 61 arcminutes above a mathematical horizon; thus is visible.

3 ] Calculates the approximate period while the upper limb of the Moon is below a reference altitude which is between about 54 and 61 arcminutes above a mathematical horizon; thus is non-visible.

4 ( Calculates the approximate time when the center of the Moon passes a reference altitude which is between about 20 and 27 arcminutes above the geocentric horizon before lunar noon time; thus rising. The phenomenon of refraction is already respected in this as it arises in reality by the influence of the Earth's atmosphere, and that with the standard value of 34 arcminutes, which can indirectly be changed by using the --atmosphere option. Fixed dates option --atmosphere=air-pressure[,temperature], how to change the base data of the atmosphere, so that the atmospheric conditions as defined by it are used to calculate the amount of refraction. The above mentioned reference altitude is computed from the respective values of the Moon's parallax and (standard) refraction as they appear at that clocktime. Nevertheless, there is exactly one day during a synodic month at which no such moonrise happens.

4 ) Calculates the approximate time when the center of the Moon passes a reference altitude which is between about 20 and 27 arcminutes above the geocentric horizon after lunar noon time; thus setting. The phenomenon of refraction is already respected in this as it arises in reality by the influence of the Earth's atmosphere, and that with the standard value of 34 arcminutes, which can indirectly be changed by using the --atmosphere option. The above mentioned reference altitude is computed from the respective values of the Moon's parallax and (standard) refraction as they appear at that clocktime. Nevertheless, there is exactly one day during a synodic month at which no such moonset happens.

4 [ Calculates the approximate period while the center of the Moon is above a reference altitude which is between about 20 and 27 arcminutes above the geocentric horizon; thus is visible.

4 ] Calculates the approximate period while the center of the Moon is below a reference altitude which is between about 20 and 27 arcminutes above the geocentric horizon; thus is non-visible.

5 ( Calculates the approximate time when the upper limb of the Moon passes a reference altitude which is between about 20 and 27 arcminutes above the geocentric horizon before lunar noon time; thus rising. This kind of rise time calculation is done according to the standard calculation method as it is commonly used internationally. The phenomenon of refraction is already respected in this as it arises in reality by the influence of the Earth's atmosphere, and that with the standard value of 34 arcminutes, which can indirectly be changed by using the --atmosphere option. Fixed dates option --atmosphere=air-pressure[,temperature], how to change the base data of the atmosphere, so that the atmospheric conditions as defined by it are used to calculate the amount of refraction. The above mentioned reference altitude is computed from the respective values of the Moon's semidiameter, Moon's parallax and (standard) refraction as they appear at that clocktime. If the reference altitude that is referring to the Moon's upper limb is converted to a reference altitude that is referring to the Moon's center, this results in a value which is between about 5 and 10 arcminutes above the geocentric horizon. Nevertheless, there is exactly one day during a synodic month at which no such moonrise happens.

5 ) Calculates the approximate time at which the upper limb of the Moon passes a reference altitude which is between about 20 and 27 arcminutes above the geocentric horizon after lunar noon time; thus setting. This kind of set time calculation is done according to the standard calculation method as it is commonly used internationally. The phenomenon of refraction is already respected in this as it arises in reality by the influence of the Earth's atmosphere, and that with the standard value of 34 arcminutes, which can indirectly be changed by using the --atmosphere option. The above mentioned reference altitude is computed from the respective values of the Moon's semidiameter, Moon's parallax and (standard) refraction as they appear at that clocktime. Nevertheless, there is exactly one day during a synodic month at which no such moonset happens.

5 [ Calculates the approximate period while the upper limb of the Moon is above a reference altitude which is between about 20 and 27 arcminutes above the geocentric horizon; thus is visible. This kind of visibility period calculation is done according to the standard calculation method as it is commonly used internationally.

5 ] Calculates the approximate period while the upper limb of the Moon is below a reference altitude which is between about 20 and 27 arcminutes above the geocentric horizon; thus is non-visible. This kind of non-visibility period calculation is done according to the standard calculation method as it is commonly used internationally.

6 (, ) Calculates the approximate topocentric, apparent horizontal parallax of the Moon in degrees and arcminutes as it happen at civil midnight time. The Moon's parallax states the diameter of the Earth as it is seen from the surface of the Moon. Observations of celestial objects that are done from the surface of the Earth yield in topocentrically based data. The locations of the celestial bodies are often at another place if the data is topocentrically determined instead of determine it geocentrically, i.e. at the fictitious center of the Earth. This is mainly caused by the refraction, which raises a celestial body to another location as it is been in reality. Because the terrestrial globe flattens towards the pole caps and therefore cannot be taken as an ideally shaped sphere, the individual Earth radius between the observer's location and the center of the Earth also affects the computation of topocentrically based data.

7 (, ) Calculates the approximate topocentric, apparent semidiameter of the Moon in degrees and arcminutes as it happen at civil midnight time.

8 (, ) Calculates the approximate topocentric, apparent brightness of the Moon in magnitude units as it happen at civil midnight time. The magnitude (Latin term magnitudo, abbreviated m) is used to define the brightness of a star, and is a non-metrical value. The difference between two consecutive magnitudes is 1 to 2.512. Therefore, a star with the brightness of 1m is 2.512 times brighter than a star of 2m. A negative magnitude denotes a very bright star, for example almost -27m for the Sun, whereas the hardly visible planet Pluto has a magnitude of a bit more than +14m. The Full Moon has a visual brightness of about -12m.55.

9 (, ) Calculates the approximate topocentric, apparent phase angle of the Moon in range 0.0...1.0 as it happen at civil midnight time.

a (, ) Calculates the approximate topocentric, apparent elevation of the Moon, thus the vertical angular distance between the Moon's center and the horizon, in degrees and arcminutes as it happen at civil midnight time. Results with a negative sign signify that the Moon's center is below the horizon at the moment, and results with a positive sign mean that the momentary center of the Moon is above the horizon.

b (, ) Calculates the approximate topocentric, apparent azimuth of the Moon in degrees and arcminutes as it happen at civil midnight time.

c (, ) Calculates the approximate topocentric, apparent declination of the Moon, thus the vertical angular distance between the Moon's center and the celestial equator, in degrees and arcminutes as it happen at civil midnight time. Results with a negative sign signify that the Moon's center is below the celestial equator at the moment, and results with a positive sign mean that the momentary center of the Moon is above the celestial equator.

d (, ) Calculates the approximate topocentric, apparent ecliptic longitude of the Moon, thus the horizontal angular distance between the Moon's center and the vernal equinox point on the ecliptic (the zodiacal line or Sun's orbit), in degrees and arcminutes as it happen at civil midnight time.

e (, ) Calculates the approximate topocentric, apparent ecliptic latitude of the Moon, thus the vertical angular distance between the Moon's center and the ecliptic (zodiacal line/Sun's orbit), in degrees and arcminutes as it happen at civil midnight time. Results with a negative sign signify that the Moon's center is North of the ecliptic at the moment, and results with a positive sign mean that the momentary center of the Moon is South of the ecliptic.

f (, ) Calculates the approximate topocentric, apparent right ascension of the Moon, thus the horizontal angular distance between the Moon's center and the hour circle that passes through the vernal equinox point on the ecliptic, as time value in hours and minutes as it happen at civil midnight time.

g (, ) Calculates the approximate topocentric, apparent distance of the Moon from the Earth in mean Earth equator radii as it happen at civil midnight time. The mean radius of Earth at the equator is about 6,378.137 kilometer.

h (, ) Calculates the approximate topocentric, apparent elongation of the Moon, thus the horizontal angular distance between the Moon's center and the Sun's center, in degrees and arcminutes as it happen at civil midnight time.

i (, ) Calculates the approximate refraction of the Earth's atmosphere in degrees and arcminutes as it happen at civil midnight time.

j (, ) Calculates the approximate geocentric, apparent horizontal parallax of the Moon in degrees and arcminutes as it happen at civil midnight time.

k (, ) Calculates the approximate geocentric, apparent semidiameter of the Moon in degrees and arcminutes as it happen at civil midnight time.

l (, ) Calculates the approximate geocentric, apparent brightness of the Moon in magnitude units as it happen at civil midnight time.

m (, ) Calculates the approximate geocentric, apparent phase angle of the Moon in range 0.0...1.0 as it happen at civil midnight time.

n (, ) Calculates the approximate geocentric, apparent elevation of the Moon in degrees and arcminutes as it happen at civil midnight time. Results with a negative sign signify that the Moon's center is below the horizon at the moment, and results with a positive sign mean that the momentary center of the Moon is above the horizon.

o (, ) Calculates the approximate geocentric, apparent azimuth of the Moon in degrees and arcminutes as it happen at civil midnight time.

p (, ) Calculates the approximate geocentric, apparent declination of the Moon in degrees and arcminutes as it happen at civil midnight time. Results with a negative sign signify that the Moon's center is below the celestial equator at the moment, and results with a positive sign mean that the momentary center of the Moon is above the celestial equator.

q (, ) Calculates the approximate geocentric, apparent ecliptic longitude of the Moon in degrees and arcminutes as it happen at civil midnight time.

r (, ) Calculates the approximate geocentric, apparent ecliptic latitude of the Moon in degrees and arcminutes as it happen at civil midnight time. Results with a negative sign signify that the Moon's center is North of the ecliptic at the moment, and results with a positive sign mean that the momentary center of the Moon is South of the ecliptic.

s (, ) Calculates the approximate geocentric, apparent right ascension of the Moon as time value in hours and minutes as it happen at civil midnight time.

t (, ) Calculates the approximate geocentric, apparent distance of the Moon from the Earth in mean Earth equator radii as it happen at civil midnight time.

u (, ) Calculates the approximate geocentric, apparent elongation of the Moon in degrees and arcminutes as it happen at civil midnight time.

v (, ) Calculates the approximate delta-t in seconds as it happen at civil midnight time. Delta-t is the difference between the Terrestrial Dynamical time (abbreviated by TDT), that was formerly known as Ephemeris time (abbreviated by ET), and the Universal time (UT). Thus, ‘delta-t == TDT - UT.

w (, ) Calculates the approximate, apparent location oriented sidereal time (local sidereal time (LAST), also known as local star time) in hours and minutes as it happen at civil midnight time. A star day is the period between two consecutive upper culminations of the vernal equinox point on the ecliptic in the meridian of the observer's location. Therefore, the local star time is the momentary period, which is past between the last upper culmination of the vernal equinox point in the meridian of the observer's location (the momentary hour angle of the vernal equinox point), thus the right ascension of the stars in the observer's meridian at the moment.

x (, ) Outputs the base time as time value in hours and minutes, for which the dynamical, i.e. depending on the respective clocktime, astronomical data and times of the Moon are calculated. Without a given --time-offset=argument option, the astronomical data and times of the Moon are always calculated for 0 o'clock Universal time (UTC/GMT). See Calendar option --time-offset=argument, for further details.

y (, ) Calculates the approximate Julian date in days as it happen at civil midnight time. See Julian day number, for further information about the Julian date.

z (, ) Calculates the approximate Julian Ephemeris date, thus a Julian date that is corrected by delta-t, in days as it happen at civil midnight time.

A (, ) Calculates the difference of the approximate topocentric, apparent elevation of Moon and Sun (delta), at which the Moon is used as the reference point, in degrees and arcminutes as it happen at civil midnight time. Results with a negative sign signify that the momentary center of the Moon is at an elevation that is below the momentary elevation of the Sun's center; thus the Moon is lower than the Sun. Results with a positive sign signify that the momentary center of the Moon is at an elevation that is above the momentary elevation of the Sun's center; thus the Moon is higher than the Sun.

B (, ) Calculates the difference of the approximate topocentric, apparent azimuth of Moon and Sun (delta), at which the Moon is used as the reference point, in degrees and arcminutes as it happen at civil midnight time. The result specifies the horizontal angular distance, by which the momentary center of the Moon is distant from the momentary Sun's center, and that measured at the vertical circles that pass the Moon and the North point and the Sun and the North point. Results with a negative sign signify that the Sun is to the right (clockwise) of the Moon if one looks to the Moon — or alternatively expressed, that the Moon is to the left (anti-clockwise) of the Sun. Results with a positive sign signify that the Sun is to the left (anti-clockwise) of the Moon if one looks to the Moon — or alternatively expressed, that the Moon is to the right (clockwise) of the Sun.

C (, ) Calculates the difference of the approximate geocentric, apparent elevation of Moon and Sun (delta), at which the Moon is used as the reference point, in degrees and arcminutes as it happen at civil midnight time.

D (, ) Calculates the difference of the approximate geocentric, apparent azimuth of Moon and Sun (delta), at which the Moon is used as the reference point, in degrees and arcminutes as it happen at civil midnight time.

E ( Calculates the difference of the approximate topocentric, apparent elevation of Moon and Sun (delta), at which the Moon is used as the reference point, in degrees and arcminutes as it happen at standard rise time of the Moon. See Standard rise time of the Moon, for further details.

E ) Calculates the difference of the approximate topocentric, apparent elevation of Moon and Sun (delta), at which the Moon is used as the reference point, in degrees and arcminutes as it happen at standard set time of the Moon. See Standard set time of the Moon, for further details.

F ( Calculates the difference of the approximate topocentric, apparent azimuth of Moon and Sun (delta), at which the Moon is used as the reference point, in degrees and arcminutes as it happen at standard rise time of the Moon. See Standard rise time of the Moon, for further details.

F ) Calculates the difference of the approximate topocentric, apparent azimuth of Moon and Sun (delta), at which the Moon is used as the reference point, in degrees and arcminutes as it happen at standard set time of the Moon. See Standard set time of the Moon, for further details.

G ( Calculates the difference of the approximate geocentric, apparent elevation of Moon and Sun (delta), at which the Moon is used as the reference point, in degrees and arcminutes as it happen at standard rise time of the Moon. See Standard rise time of the Moon, for further details.

G ) Calculates the difference of the approximate geocentric, apparent elevation of Moon and Sun (delta), at which the Moon is used as the reference point, in degrees and arcminutes as it happen at standard set time of the Moon. See Standard set time of the Moon, for further details.

H ( Calculates the difference of the approximate geocentric, apparent azimuth of Moon and Sun (delta), at which the Moon is used as the reference point, in degrees and arcminutes as it happen at standard rise time of the Moon. See Standard rise time of the Moon, for further details.

H ) Calculates the difference of the approximate geocentric, apparent azimuth of Moon and Sun (delta), at which the Moon is used as the reference point, in degrees and arcminutes as it happen at standard set time of the Moon. See Standard set time of the Moon, for further details.

I (, ) Calculates the difference of the approximate astronomical midnight times of Moon and Sun (delta), at which the Moon is used as the reference point, as time value in hours and minutes as it happen at astronomical midnight time of the Moon. Results with a negative sign signify that the astronomical midnight time of the Moon is earlier than the astronomical midnight time of the Sun; thus the lunar midnight is before the solar midnight. Results with a positive sign signify that the astronomical midnight time of the Moon is later than the astronomical midnight time of the Sun; thus the lunar midnight is after the solar midnight. See Astronomical midnight time of the Moon, and Astronomical midnight time of the Sun, for further details.

J (, ) Calculates the difference of the approximate astronomical noon times of Moon and Sun (delta), at which the Moon is used as the reference point, as time value in hours and minutes as it happen at astronomical noon time of the Moon. Results with a negative sign signify that the astronomical noon time of the Moon is earlier than the astronomical noon time of the Sun; thus the lunar noon is before the solar noon. Results with a positive sign signify that the astronomical noon time of the Moon is later than the astronomical noon time of the Sun; thus the lunar noon is after the solar noon. See Astronomical noon time of the Moon, and Astronomical noon time of the Sun, for further details.

K ( Calculates the difference of the approximate standard rise times of Moon and Sun (delta), at which the Moon is used as the reference point, as time value in hours and minutes as it happen at standard rise time of the Moon. Results with a negative sign signify that the standard rise time of the Moon is earlier than the standard rise time of the Sun; thus the moonrise is before the sunrise. Results with a positive sign signify that the standard rise time of the Moon is later than the standard rise time of the Sun; thus the moonrise is after the sunrise. See Standard rise time of the Moon, and Standard rise time of the Sun, for further details.

K ) Calculates the difference of the approximate standard set times of Moon and Sun (delta), at which the Moon is used as the reference point, as time value in hours and minutes as it happen at standard set time of the Moon. Results with a negative sign signify that the standard set time of the Moon is earlier than the standard set time of the Sun; thus the moonset is before the sunset. Results with a positive sign signify that the standard set time of the Moon is later than the standard set time of the Sun; thus the moonset is after the sunset. See Standard set time of the Moon, and Standard set time of the Sun, for further details.

L (, ) Calculates the approximate topocentric, apparent elevation of the Moon in degrees and arcminutes as it happen at astronomical midnight time of the Moon (topocentric midnight height). See Astronomical midnight time of the Moon, for further details.

M (, ) Calculates the approximate topocentric, apparent phase angle of the Moon in range 0.0...1.0 as it happen at astronomical midnight time of the Moon (topocentric midnight phase angle). See Astronomical midnight time of the Moon, for further details.

N (, ) Calculates the approximate topocentric, apparent elevation of the Moon in degrees and arcminutes as it happen at astronomical noon time of the Moon (topocentric noon height). See Astronomical noon time of the Moon, for further details.

O (, ) Calculates the approximate topocentric, apparent phase angle of the Moon in range 0.0...1.0 as it happen at astronomical noon time of the Moon (topocentric noon phase angle). See Astronomical noon time of the Moon, for further details.

P ( Calculates the approximate topocentric, apparent elevation of the Moon in degrees and arcminutes as it happen at standard rise time of the Moon (topocentric rise height). See Standard rise time of the Moon, for further details.

P ) Calculates the approximate topocentric, apparent elevation of the Moon in degrees and arcminutes as it happen at standard set time of the Moon (topocentric set height). See Standard set time of the Moon, for further details.

Q ( Calculates the approximate topocentric, apparent azimuth of the Moon in degrees and arcminutes as it happen at standard rise time of the Moon (topocentric rise azimuth). The horizontal angular distance between the topocentric rise azimuth and the East direction is also known as the topocentric rise width of the Moon. See Standard rise time of the Moon, for further details.

Q ) Calculates the approximate topocentric, apparent azimuth of the Moon in degrees and arcminutes as it happen at standard set time of the Moon (topocentric set azimuth). The horizontal angular distance between the topocentric set azimuth and the West direction is also known as the topocentric set width of the Moon. See Standard set time of the Moon, for further details.

R ( Calculates the approximate topocentric, apparent phase angle of the Moon in range 0.0...1.0 as it happen at standard rise time of the Moon (topocentric rise phase angle). See Standard rise time of the Moon, for further details.

R ) Calculates the approximate topocentric, apparent phase angle of the Moon in range 0.0...1.0 as it happen at standard set time of the Moon (topocentric set phase angle). See Standard set time of the Moon, for further details.

S (, ) Calculates the approximate geocentric, apparent elevation of the Moon in degrees and arcminutes as it happen at astronomical midnight time of the Moon (geocentric midnight height). See Astronomical midnight time of the Moon, for further details.

T (, ) Calculates the approximate geocentric, apparent phase angle of the Moon in range 0.0...1.0 as it happen at astronomical midnight time of the Moon (geocentric midnight phase angle). See Astronomical midnight time of the Moon, for further details.

U (, ) Calculates the approximate geocentric, apparent elevation of the Moon in degrees and arcminutes as it happen at astronomical noon time of the Moon (geocentric noon height). See Astronomical noon time of the Moon, for further details.

V (, ) Calculates the approximate geocentric, apparent phase angle of the Moon in range 0.0...1.0 as it happen at astronomical noon time of the Moon (geocentric noon phase angle). See Astronomical noon time of the Moon, for further details.

W ( Calculates the approximate geocentric, apparent elevation of the Moon in degrees and arcminutes as it happen at standard rise time of the Moon (geocentric rise height). See Standard rise time of the Moon, for further details.

W ) Calculates the approximate geocentric, apparent elevation of the Moon in degrees and arcminutes as it happen at standard set time of the Moon (geocentric set height). See Standard set time of the Moon, for further details.

X ( Calculates the approximate geocentric, apparent azimuth of the Moon in degrees and arcminutes as it happen at standard rise time of the Moon (geocentric rise azimuth). The horizontal angular distance between the geocentric rise azimuth and the East direction is also known as the geocentric rise width of the Moon. See Standard rise time of the Moon, for further details.

X ) Calculates the approximate geocentric, apparent azimuth of the Moon in degrees and arcminutes as it happen at standard set time of the Moon (geocentric set azimuth). The horizontal angular distance between the geocentric set azimuth and the West direction is also known as the geocentric set width of the Moon. See Standard set time of the Moon, for further details.

Y ( Calculates the approximate geocentric, apparent phase angle of the Moon in range 0.0...1.0 as it happen at standard rise time of the Moon (geocentric rise phase angle). See Standard rise time of the Moon, for further details.

Y ) Calculates the approximate geocentric, apparent phase angle of the Moon in range 0.0...1.0 as it happen at standard set time of the Moon (geocentric set phase angle). See Standard set time of the Moon, for further details.

If no mode is given, Gcal automatically uses that mode, which is enabled by the mode character ‘5’. If a mode character is given that is not according to one of the ‘0...9, ‘a...z and ‘A...Y characters, Gcal also automatically uses that mode, which is enabled by the mode character ‘5’.

Depending on the selected mode, Gcal represents the Moon oriented special texts using the same types and styles as they are used by the Sun oriented special texts, these are analogously valid! See Representation of the Sun oriented special texts, for the detailed description of the different types of representation used by the Sun oriented special texts, which are likewise valid for the Moon oriented special texts.

The argument the Moon oriented special texts must have is exactly equivalent the argument the Sun oriented special texts must have! See Arguments of the Sun oriented special texts, for the detailed description of the components of the argument which also has to be given to the Moon oriented special texts.

The following table informs you about which type of representation is caused by a mode. The previously defined numbering scheme, as it has been used for the introduction of the types of representation, is used as key value in the column that holds the type of representation. The table also contains a column that shows whether a mode enables dynamical values, i.e. values that are depending on the respective clocktime (if you use the --time-offset=argument option, you can change the respective clocktime that is used for calculating such values). In a next table column, it is listed whether the given co-ordinate of the location influences the determination of a value, and the last column of the table gives you the information whether a given timezone value affects the values determination:

Mode Representation Type Dynamical Co-ordinate Timezone

0 3 No Yes Yes
1 3 No Yes Yes
2 3 or 4 No Yes Yes
3 3 or 4 No Yes Yes
4 3 or 4 No Yes Yes
5 3 or 4 No Yes Yes
6 6 Yes Yes Yes
7 6 Yes Yes Yes
8 2 Yes Yes Yes
9 1 or 1b Yes Yes Yes
a 7 Yes Yes Yes
b 6 Yes Yes Yes
c 7 Yes Yes Yes
d 6 Yes Yes Yes
e 7 Yes Yes Yes
f 4 Yes Yes Yes
g 1 or 1a Yes Yes Yes
h 6 Yes Yes Yes
i 6 Yes No No
j 6 Yes Yes Yes
k 6 Yes Yes Yes
l 2 Yes Yes Yes
m 1 or 1b Yes Yes Yes
n 7 Yes Yes Yes
o 6 Yes Yes Yes
p 7 Yes Yes Yes
q 6 Yes Yes Yes
r 7 Yes Yes Yes
s 4 Yes Yes Yes
t 1 or 1a Yes Yes Yes
u 6 Yes Yes Yes
v 2 Yes No No
w 3 Yes Yes Yes
x 3 Yes No No
y 1 Yes No No
z 1 Yes No No
A 7 Yes Yes Yes
B 7 Yes Yes Yes
C 7 Yes Yes Yes
D 7 Yes Yes Yes
E 7 No Yes Yes
F 7 No Yes Yes
G 7 No Yes Yes
H 7 No Yes Yes
I 5 No Yes Yes
J 5 No Yes Yes
K 5 No Yes Yes
L 7 No Yes Yes
M 1 or 1b No Yes Yes
N 7 No Yes Yes
O 1 or 1b No Yes Yes
P 7 No Yes Yes
Q 6 No Yes Yes
R 1 or 1b No Yes Yes
S 7 No Yes Yes
T 1 or 1b No Yes Yes
U 7 No Yes Yes
V 1 or 1b No Yes Yes
W 7 No Yes Yes
X 6 No Yes Yes
Y 1 or 1b No Yes Yes

And now some examples to these special texts:

The text ‘Moonrise at %(+5158+00738,120  in MS, BRD will be expanded to
==> ‘Moonrise at 12:21 in MS, BRD, in case the actual system date is the 1st June 1998.
The text ‘Moonset at %)*5+5158+00738,120  in MS, BRD will be expanded to
==> ‘Moonset at 01:53am in MS, BRD, in case the actual system date is the 1st June 1998.
The text ‘Moon visible %[5+5158+00738,120  in MS, BRD will be expanded to
==> ‘Moon visible 13h32' in MS, BRD, in case the actual system date is the 1st June 1998.
The text ‘Moon non-visible %]*+5158+00738,120  in MS, BRD will be expanded to
==> ‘Moon non-visible 10.469 in MS, BRD, in case the actual system date is the 1st June 1998.
The text ‘Moon azimuth 0 o'clock=%(*a+5158+00738,120  in MS, BRD will be expanded to
==> ‘Moon azimuth 0 o'clock=267d37' in MS, BRD, in case the actual system date is the 1st June 1998.
The text ‘Moonphase %(x+00+000 =%(*m+5158+00738,120 % in MS, BRD will be expanded to
==> ‘Moonphase +16h00'=45.248% in MS, BRD, in case you call Gcal with the --time-offset=16: option and the actual system date is the 1st June 1998.
The text ‘Julian date at %(x+00+000 =%(y+00+000 will be expanded to
==> ‘Julian date at +10h15'=2450965.927, in case you call Gcal with the --time-offset=10:15 option and the actual system date is the 1st June 1998.

Here is a list that reports about the used reference systems in a short manner, describes other aspects that are unmentioned now, and informs about the lacks and limitations that are existing for the Moon oriented special texts:

Please also note the following references:

All Moon oriented special texts must always be trailed by a whitespace character which is removed in output!