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1.49.4 BLOX.BWidget: geometry management

boundingBox
Answer a Rectangle containing the bounding box of the receiver


boundingBox: rect
Set the bounding box of the receiver to rect (a Rectangle).


child: child height: value
Set the given child's height to value. The default implementation of this method uses `rubber-sheet' geometry management as explained in the comment to BWidget's #height method. You should not use this method, which is automatically called by the child's #height: method, but you might want to override it. The child's property slots whose name ends with `Geom' are reserved for this method. This method should never fail – if it doesn't apply to the kind of geometry management that the receiver does, just do nothing.


child: child heightOffset: value
Adjust the given child's height by a fixed amount of value pixel. This is meaningful for the default implementation, using `rubber-sheet' geometry management as explained in the comment to BWidget's #height and #heightOffset: methods. You should not use this method, which is automatically called by the child's #heightOffset: method, but you might want to override it. if it doesn't apply to the kind of geometry management that the receiver does, just add value to the current height of the widget.


child: child stretch: aBoolean
This method is only used when on the path from the receiver to its toplevel there is a BContainer. It decides whether child is among the widgets that are stretched to fill the entire width of the BContainer; if this has not been set for this widget, it is propagated along the widget hierarchy.


child: child width: value
Set the given child's width to value. The default implementation of this method uses `rubber-sheet' geometry management as explained in the comment to BWidget's #width method. You should not use this method, which is automatically called by the child's #width: method, but you might want to override it. The child's property slots whose name ends with `Geom' are reserved for this method. This method should never fail – if it doesn't apply to the kind of geometry management that the receiver does, just do nothing.


child: child widthOffset: value
Adjust the given child's width by a fixed amount of value pixel. This is meaningful for the default implementation, using `rubber-sheet' geometry management as explained in the comment to BWidget's #width and #widthOffset: methods. You should not use this method, which is automatically called by the child's #widthOffset: method, but you might want to override it. if it doesn't apply to the kind of geometry management that the receiver does, just add value to the current width of the widget.


child: child x: value
Set the given child's x to value. The default implementation of this method uses `rubber-sheet' geometry management as explained in the comment to BWidget's #x method. You should not use this method, which is automatically called by the child's #x: method, but you might want to override it. The child's property slots whose name ends with `Geom' are reserved for this method. This method should never fail – if it doesn't apply to the kind of geometry management that the receiver does, just do nothing.


child: child xOffset: value
Adjust the given child's x by a fixed amount of value pixel. This is meaningful for the default implementation, using `rubber-sheet' geometry management as explained in the comment to BWidget's #x and #xOffset: methods. You should not use this method, which is automatically called by the child's #xOffset: method, but you might want to override it. if it doesn't apply to the kind of geometry management that the receiver does, just add value to the current x of the widget.


child: child y: value
Set the given child's y to value. The default implementation of this method uses `rubber-sheet' geometry management as explained in the comment to BWidget's #y method. You should not use this method, which is automatically called by the child's #y: method, but you might want to override it. The child's property slots whose name ends with `Geom' are reserved for this method. This method should never fail – if it doesn't apply to the kind of geometry management that the receiver does, just do nothing.


child: child yOffset: value
Adjust the given child's y by a fixed amount of value pixel. This is meaningful for the default implementation, using `rubber-sheet' geometry management as explained in the comment to BWidget's #y and #yOffset: methods. You should not use this method, which is automatically called by the child's #yOffset: method, but you might want to override it. if it doesn't apply to the kind of geometry management that the receiver does, just add value to the current y of the widget.


extent
Answer a Point containing the receiver's size


extent: extent
Set the receiver's size to the width and height contained in extent (a Point).


height
Answer the `variable' part of the receiver's height within the parent widget. The value returned does not include any fixed amount of pixels indicated by #heightOffset: and must be interpreted in a relative fashion: the ratio of the returned value to the current size of the parent will be preserved upon resize. This apparently complicated method is known as `rubber sheet' geometry management. Behavior if the left or right edges are not within the client area of the parent is not defined – the window might be clamped or might be positioned according to the specification.


height: value
Set to `value' the height of the widget within the parent widget. The value is specified in a relative fashion as an integer, so that the ratio of `value' to the current size of the parent will be preserved upon resize. This apparently complicated method is known as `rubber sheet' geometry management.


heightAbsolute
Force a recalculation of the layout of widgets in the receiver's parent, then answer the current height of the receiver in pixels.


heightChild: child
Answer the given child's height. The default implementation of this method uses `rubber-sheet' geometry management as explained in the comment to BWidget's #height method. You should not use this method, which is automatically called by the child's #height method, but you might want to override. The child's property slots whose name ends with `Geom' are reserved for this method. This method should never fail – if it doesn't apply to the kind of geometry management that the receiver does, just return 0.


heightOffset
Private - Answer the pixels to be added or subtracted to the height of the receiver, with respect to the value set in a relative fashion through the #height: method.

and

heightOffset: value
Add or subtract to the height of the receiver a fixed amount of `value' pixels, with respect to the value set in a relative fashion through the #height: method. Usage of this method is deprecated; use #inset: and BContainers instead.


heightPixels: value
Set the current height of the receiver to `value' pixels. Note that, after calling this method, #height will answer 0, which is logical considering that there is no `variable' part of the size (refer to #height and #height: for more explanations).


inset: pixels
Inset the receiver's bounding box by the specified amount.


left: left top: top right: right bottom: bottom
Set the bounding box of the receiver through its components.


pos: position
Set the receiver's origin to the width and height contained in position (a Point).


posHoriz: aBlox
Position the receiver immediately to the right of aBlox.


posVert: aBlox
Position the receiver just below aBlox.


stretch: aBoolean
This method is only considered when on the path from the receiver to its toplevel there is a BContainer. It decides whether we are among the widgets that are stretched to fill the entire width of the BContainer.


width
Answer the `variable' part of the receiver's width within the parent widget. The value returned does not include any fixed amount of pixels indicated by #widthOffset: and must be interpreted in a relative fashion: the ratio of the returned value to the current size of the parent will be preserved upon resize. This apparently complicated method is known as `rubber sheet' geometry management. Behavior if the left or right edges are not within the client area of the parent is not defined – the window might be clamped or might be positioned according to the specification.


width: value
Set to `value' the width of the widget within the parent widget. The value is specified in a relative fashion as an integer, so that the ratio of `value' to the current size of the parent will be preserved upon resize. This apparently complicated method is known as `rubber sheet' geometry management.


width: xSize height: ySize
Set the size of the receiver through its components xSize and ySize.


widthAbsolute
Force a recalculation of the layout of widgets in the receiver's parent, then answer the current width of the receiver in pixels.


widthChild: child
Answer the given child's width. The default implementation of this method uses `rubber-sheet' geometry management as explained in the comment to BWidget's #width method. You should not use this method, which is automatically called by the child's #width method, but you might want to override. The child's property slots whose name ends with `Geom' are reserved for this method. This method should never fail – if it doesn't apply to the kind of geometry management that the receiver does, just return 0.


widthOffset
Private - Answer the pixels to be added or subtracted to the width of the receiver, with respect to the value set in a relative fashion through the #width: method.

and

widthOffset: value
Add or subtract to the width of the receiver a fixed amount of `value' pixels, with respect to the value set in a relative fashion through the #width: method. Usage of this method is deprecated; use #inset: and BContainers instead.


widthPixels: value
Set the current width of the receiver to `value' pixels. Note that, after calling this method, #width will answer 0, which is logical considering that there is no `variable' part of the size (refer to #width and #width: for more explanations).


x
Answer the `variable' part of the receiver's x within the parent widget. The value returned does not include any fixed amount of pixels indicated by #xOffset: and must be interpreted in a relative fashion: the ratio of the returned value to the current size of the parent will be preserved upon resize. This apparently complicated method is known as `rubber sheet' geometry management. Behavior if the left or right edges are not within the client area of the parent is not defined – the window might be clamped or might be positioned according to the specification.


x: value
Set to `value' the x of the widget within the parent widget. The value is specified in a relative fashion as an integer, so that the ratio of `value' to the current size of the parent will be preserved upon resize. This apparently complicated method is known as `rubber sheet' geometry management.


x: xPos y: yPos
Set the origin of the receiver through its components xPos and yPos.


x: xPos y: yPos width: xSize height: ySize
Set the bounding box of the receiver through its origin and size.


xAbsolute
Force a recalculation of the layout of widgets in the receiver's parent, then answer the current x of the receiver in pixels.


xChild: child
Answer the given child's x. The default implementation of this method uses `rubber-sheet' geometry management as explained in the comment to BWidget's #x method. You should not use this method, which is automatically called by the child's #x method, but you might want to override. The child's property slots whose name ends with `Geom' are reserved for this method. This method should never fail – if it doesn't apply to the kind of geometry management that the receiver does, just return 0.


xOffset
Private - Answer the pixels to be added or subtracted to the x of the receiver, with respect to the value set in a relative fashion through the #x: method.

and

xOffset: value
Add or subtract to the x of the receiver a fixed amount of `value' pixels, with respect to the value set in a relative fashion through the #x: method. Usage of this method is deprecated; use #inset: and BContainers instead.


xPixels: value
Set the current x of the receiver to `value' pixels. Note that, after calling this method, #x will answer 0, which is logical considering that there is no `variable' part of the size (refer to #x and #x: for more explanations).


xRoot
Answer the x position of the receiver with respect to the top-left corner of the desktop (including the offset of the virtual root window under X).


y
Answer the `variable' part of the receiver's y within the parent widget. The value returned does not include any fixed amount of pixels indicated by #yOffset: and must be interpreted in a relative fashion: the ratio of the returned value to the current size of the parent will be preserved upon resize. This apparently complicated method is known as `rubber sheet' geometry management. Behavior if the left or right edges are not within the client area of the parent is not defined – the window might be clamped or might be positioned according to the specification.


y: value
Set to `value' the y of the widget within the parent widget. The value is specified in a relative fashion as an integer, so that the ratio of `value' to the current size of the parent will be preserved upon resize. This apparently complicated method is known as `rubber sheet' geometry management.


yAbsolute
Force a recalculation of the layout of widgets in the receiver's parent, then answer the current y of the receiver in pixels.


yChild: child
Answer the given child's y. The default implementation of this method uses `rubber-sheet' geometry management as explained in the comment to BWidget's #y method. You should not use this method, which is automatically called by the child's #y method, but you might want to override. The child's property slots whose name ends with `Geom' are reserved for this method. This method should never fail – if it doesn't apply to the kind of geometry management that the receiver does, just return 0.


yOffset
Private - Answer the pixels to be added or subtracted to the y of the receiver, with respect to the value set in a relative fashion through the #y: method.

and

yOffset: value
Add or subtract to the y of the receiver a fixed amount of `value' pixels, with respect to the value set in a relative fashion through the #y: method. Usage of this method is deprecated; use #inset: and BContainers instead.


yPixels: value
Set the current y of the receiver to `value' pixels. Note that, after calling this method, #y will answer 0, which is logical considering that there is no `variable' part of the size (refer to #y and #y: for more explanations).


yRoot
Answer the y position of the receiver with respect to the top-left corner of the desktop (including the offset of the virtual root window under X).