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D.3 Inserting Frequently Used Commands

Texinfo mode provides commands to insert various frequently used @-commands into the buffer. You can use these commands to save keystrokes.

The insert commands are invoked by typing C-c twice and then the first letter of the @-command:

C-c C-c c
M-x texinfo-insert-@code

Insert @code{} and put the cursor between the braces.

C-c C-c d
M-x texinfo-insert-@dfn

Insert @dfn{} and put the cursor between the braces.

C-c C-c e
M-x texinfo-insert-@end

Insert @end and attempt to insert the correct following word, such as ‘example’ or ‘table’. (This command does not handle nested lists correctly, but inserts the word appropriate to the immediately preceding list.)

C-c C-c i
M-x texinfo-insert-@item

Insert @item and put the cursor at the beginning of the next line.

C-c C-c k
M-x texinfo-insert-@kbd

Insert @kbd{} and put the cursor between the braces.

C-c C-c n
M-x texinfo-insert-@node

Insert @node and a comment line listing the sequence for the ‘Next’, ‘Previous’, and ‘Up’ nodes. Leave point after the @node.

C-c C-c o
M-x texinfo-insert-@noindent

Insert @noindent and put the cursor at the beginning of the next line.

C-c C-c s
M-x texinfo-insert-@samp

Insert @samp{} and put the cursor between the braces.

C-c C-c t
M-x texinfo-insert-@table

Insert @table followed by a SPC and leave the cursor after the SPC.

C-c C-c v
M-x texinfo-insert-@var

Insert @var{} and put the cursor between the braces.

C-c C-c x
M-x texinfo-insert-@example

Insert @example and put the cursor at the beginning of the next line.

C-c C-c {
M-x texinfo-insert-braces

Insert {} and put the cursor between the braces.

C-c }
C-c ]
M-x up-list

Move from between a pair of braces forward past the closing brace. Typing C-c ] is easier than typing C-c }, which is, however, more mnemonic; hence the two keybindings. (Also, you can move out from between braces by typing C-f.)

To put a command such as @code{…} around an existing word, position the cursor in front of the word and type C-u 1 C-c C-c c. This makes it easy to edit existing plain text. The value of the prefix argument tells Emacs how many words following point to include between braces—‘1’ for one word, ‘2’ for two words, and so on. Use a negative argument to enclose the previous word or words. If you do not specify a prefix argument, Emacs inserts the @-command string and positions the cursor between the braces. This feature works only for those @-commands that operate on a word or words within one line, such as @kbd and @var.

This set of insert commands was created after analyzing the frequency with which different @-commands are used in the GNU Emacs Manual and the GDB Manual. If you wish to add your own insert commands, you can bind a keyboard macro to a key, use abbreviations, or extend the code in texinfo.el.

C-c C-c C-d (texinfo-start-menu-description) is an insert command that works differently from the other insert commands. It inserts a node’s section or chapter title in the space for the description in a menu entry line. (A menu entry has three parts, the entry name, the node name, and the description. Only the node name is required, but a description helps explain what the node is about. See The Parts of a Menu.)

To use texinfo-start-menu-description, position point in a menu entry line and type C-c C-c C-d. The command looks for and copies the title that goes with the node name, and inserts the title as a description; it positions point at beginning of the inserted text so you can edit it. The function does not insert the title if the menu entry line already contains a description.

This command is only an aid to writing descriptions; it does not do the whole job. You must edit the inserted text since a title tends to use the same words as a node name but a useful description uses different words.


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