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10.1 Block Enclosing Commands

Here is a summary of commands that enclose blocks of text, also known as environments. They’re explained further in the following sections.


Indicate text that is quoted. The text is filled, indented (from both margins), and printed in a roman font by default.


Like @quotation, but the text is indented only on the left.


Illustrate code, commands, and the like. The text is printed in a fixed-width font, and indented but not filled.


Like @example, but specifically for illustrating Lisp code. The text is printed in a fixed-width font, and indented but not filled.


Mark a piece of text that is to be printed verbatim; no character substitutions are made and all commands are ignored, until the next @end verbatim. The text is printed in a fixed-width font, and not indented or filled. Extra spaces and blank lines are significant, and tabs are expanded.


Display illustrative text. The text is indented but not filled, and no font is selected (so, by default, the font is roman).


Like @display (the text is not filled and no font is selected), but the text is not indented.


These @small... commands are just like their non-small counterparts, except that they output text in a smaller font size, where possible.


Text is not filled, but is set flush with the left or right margin, respectively.


Text is filled, but only justified on the left, leaving the right margin ragged.


Highlight text, often an example or quotation, by drawing a box with rounded corners around it.

The @exdent command is used within the above constructs to undo the indentation of a line.

The @noindent command may be used after one of the above constructs (or at the beginning of any paragraph) to prevent the following text from being indented as a new paragraph.

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