Next: , Previous: Structure of resource file, Up: Resource file


5.1.2 Date part of a line

The structure of a date part —which gives Gcal the information at which date a fixed date happens— of a line in the resource file is

eitheryyyy[mm[dd|wwwn]]

yyyy
(4 digits), is the year including the century (range 0000...9999). Leading zeroes are required in case the defined year is less than 1000 and other components of the date part are trailing the year.
mm
(2 digits or 3 characters), is the month (range 00...12 or 99, respectively Jan, Feb...). A given 99 for the month means the last month of the year (== December). Leading zeroes are required in case the defined month is less than 10 and other components of the date part are trailing the month.
dd
(2 digits), is the day (range 00...31 or 99). A given 99 for the day means the last day of the month. Leading zeroes are required in case the defined day is less than 10 and other components of the date part are trailing the day.
www
(2...3 characters), is a short weekday name (range Mon...Sun).
n
(1 digit), is the n'th weekday www of month (range 1...5 or 9).
  • n == 1...5
    n'th weekday www of month.
  • n == 9
    Last weekday www of month.

oryyyy*d|wn[www]

yyyy
(4 digits), is the year including the century (range 0000...9999). Leading zeroes are required in case the defined year is less than 1000 and other components of the date part are trailing the year.
*d
(2 characters), is the reference to an ordinary date.
*w
(2 characters), is either the reference to a date of an ISO week or the reference to a date of a standard week.
n
(1...3 digits), is the value in days or in weeks, the fixed date occurs. A given 99 connected with a short weekday name means the last weekday www of the year. A given 999 connected with *d means the last day of a year, i.e. the 31st December. If the computed date does not occur in the year, i.e. exceeds the year bounds, the fixed date message is suppressed.
www
(2...3 characters), is a short weekday name (range Mon...Sun).

oryyyy@e|t|dvar[[+|-]n]

yyyy
(4 digits), is the year including the century (range 0000...9999). Leading zeroes are required in case the defined year is less than 1000 and other components of the date part are trailing the year.
@e
(2 characters), is the reference to the Easter Sunday's date.
@t
(2 characters), is the reference to today's date.
@dvar
(2 characters), is the reference to a date variable.
[+|-]n
(1...4 alphanumeric characters), is the optional displacement value in days, the fixed date occurs relative to the Easter Sunday's date, relative to today's date, or relative to a date variables date. A given -999 means the first day of a year, i.e. the 1st January. A given +999 or 999 means the last day of a year, i.e. the 31st December. If the computed date does not occur in the year, i.e. exceeds the year bounds, the fixed date message is suppressed.

oryyyy@e|t|dvar[+|-]nwww

yyyy
(4 digits), is the year including the century (range 0000...9999). Leading zeroes are required in case the defined year is less than 1000 and other components of the date part are trailing the year.
@e
(2 characters), is the reference to the Easter Sunday's date.
@t
(2 characters), is the reference to today's date.
@dvar
(2 characters), is the reference to a date variable.
[+|-]nwww
(3...7 alphanumeric characters), is the optional displacement value in weekdays, the fixed date occurs relative to the Easter Sunday's date, relative to today's date, or relative to a date variables date. A given -99 means the first weekday www of the year. A given +99 or 99 means the last weekday www of the year. If the computed date does not occur in the year, i.e. exceeds the year bounds, the fixed date message is suppressed.

Please note:

Hint:
Preceding table ease misleading assumption that a fixed date, which shall be valid for any days of the year, can be defined with a date part only consisting of a 0. But that is only correct in that the so-defined fixed date is respected in some few fixed date periods only (see Coding Scheme).

If a fixed date is defined which shall be respected for any days of the year, it must be designed with a 0*d1#999 date part. For example, the same is likewise valid for fixed dates which represent a weekly event, and that shall be valid during all the year. Instead of creating such a fixed date with a 000000www date part (that is likewise respected in some few fixed date periods only), it should be defined with a date part like 0*d1www#99www.7. See Ranges of days, and Appearance factor of days, for further information.