GNU Astronomy Utilities


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2.1.2 Accessing documentation

Gnuastro contains a large number of programs and it is natural to forget the details of each program’s options or inputs and outputs. Therefore, before starting the analysis steps of this tutorial, let’s review how you can access this book to refresh your memory any time you want, without having to take your hands off the keyboard.

When you install Gnuastro, this book is also installed on your system along with all the programs and libraries, so you do not need an internet connection to access/read it. Also, by accessing this book as described below, you can be sure that it corresponds to your installed version of Gnuastro.

GNU Info25 is the program in charge of displaying the manual on the command-line (for more, see Info). To see this whole book on your command-line, please run the following command and press subsequent keys. Info has its own mini-environment, therefore we will show the keys that must be pressed in the mini-environment after a -> sign. You can also ignore anything after the # sign in the middle of the line, they are only for your information.

$ info gnuastro                # Open the top of the manual.
-> <SPACE>                     # All the book chapters.
-> <SPACE>                     # Continue down: show sections.
-> <SPACE> ...                 # Keep pressing space to go down.
-> q                           # Quit Info, return to the command-line.

The thing that greatly simplifies navigation in Info is the links (regions with an underline). You can immediately go to the next link in the page with the <TAB> key and press <ENTER> on it to go into that part of the manual. Try the commands above again, but this time also use <TAB> to go to the links and press <ENTER> on them to go to the respective section of the book. Then follow a few more links and go deeper into the book. To return to the previous page, press l (small L). If you are searching for a specific phrase in the whole book (for example, an option name), press s and type your search phrase and end it with an <ENTER>.

You do not need to start from the top of the manual every time. For example, to get to Invoking NoiseChisel, run the following command. In general, all programs have such an “Invoking ProgramName” section in this book. These sections are specifically for the description of inputs, outputs and configuration options of each program. You can access them directly for each program by giving its executable name to Info.

$ info astnoisechisel

The other sections do not have such shortcuts. To directly access them from the command-line, you need to tell Info to look into Gnuastro’s manual, then look for the specific section (an unambiguous title is necessary). For example, if you only want to review/remember NoiseChisel’s Detection options), just run the following command. Note how case is irrelevant for Info when calling a title in this manner.

$ info gnuastro "Detection options"

In general, Info is a powerful and convenient way to access this whole book with detailed information about the programs you are running. If you are not already familiar with it, please run the following command and just read along and do what it says to learn it. Do not stop until you feel sufficiently fluent in it. Please invest the half an hour’s time necessary to start using Info comfortably. It will greatly improve your productivity and you will start reaping the rewards of this investment very soon.

$ info info

As a good scientist you need to feel comfortable to play with the features/options and avoid (be critical to) using default values as much as possible. On the other hand, our human memory is limited, so it is important to be able to easily access any part of this book fast and remember the option names, what they do and their acceptable values.

If you just want the option names and a short description, calling the program with the --help option might also be a good solution like the first example below. If you know a few characters of the option name, you can feed the printed output to grep like the second or third example commands.

$ astnoisechisel --help
$ astnoisechisel --help | grep quant
$ astnoisechisel --help | grep check

Footnotes

(25)

GNU Info is already available on almost all Unix-like operating systems.


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