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GNU ccd2cue - CCD sheet to CUE sheet converter

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Manifesto: On the internet there is a gigantic quantity of optical disc image files in numerous formats. Countless times we need to burn some of them. Some time ago I needed it, but I came across a file format extremely irritating for a Free Software user like me: a CD layout descriptor file, with .ccd suffix, generated by a proprietary software called CloneCD. I searched the internet for a way to burn that file on the GNU+Linux-Libre system, but I only found a lot of people asking for a solution in a lot of forums, and getting the unanimous answer: no way! At first I could not believe that at that point there was no option. Then, with a little bit of patience and research, I wrote some code to convert those files into a format much more common and accessible, an ad-hoc standard in the GNU operating system: the CUE sheet format. So I could burn a lot of what I wanted! I wondered whether it would be useful for others… and here is the result!

Bruno Félix Rezende Ribeiro (oitofelix)

GNU ccd2cue is a CCD sheet to CUE sheet converter. It supports the full extent of CUE sheet format expressiveness, including mixed-mode discs and CD-Text meta-data. It plays an important role for those who need to use optical disc data which is only available in the proprietary sheet format CCD, but don’t want to surrender their freedom. It fills an important gap in the free software world because before its conception it was impossible to use complex forms of optical disc data laid out by CCD sheets in a whole/holy free operating system.

images/gplThe GNU ccd2cue software is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify it under the terms of the GNU GPL (General Public Licence) as published by the FSF (Free Software Foundation); either version 3, or (at your option) any later version.

The GNU ccd2cue documentation is also intended to be a reference documentation for both sheet format specifications. That way we can reverse engineer the secret CCD sheet proprietary format only once and then make the information available for developers in order to benefit all free software users that want their software to be interoperable. The CUE sheet format is not a secret, but with this package we take the opportunity to ensure that its specification is available under a free documentation license for the sake of the whole free software community.

images/fdlThe GNU ccd2cue documentation is free documentation; you can redistribute it and/or modify it under the terms of the GNU FDL (Free Documentation Licence) as published by the FSF — with no Invariant Sections; either version 1.3, or (at your option) any later version.

Download

The current stable release is 0.3 (released January 23, 2014). You can download it here: ccd2cue-0.3.tar.gz, ccd2cue-0.3.tar.gz.sig (alternative: ccd2cue-0.3.tar.gz, ccd2cue-0.3.tar.gz.sig).

You can find that and earlier releases at a nearby GNU ftp mirror; or if automatic redirection does not work use the GNU main ftp server.

This release is signed by Bruno Félix Rezende Ribeiro. His key ID is 0x28D618AF. You can retrieve that key from a key server using the command

gpg --recv-keys 0x28D618AF --keyserver hkp://keys.gnupg.net

Check the key’s authenticity with the command

gpg --fingerprint 0x28D618AF | sed -n '/^[[:blank:]]\+Key/s/^.*= //p'

It must print the following fingerprint:

7CB1 208C 7336 56B7 5962  2500 27B9 C6FD 28D6 18AF

Otherwise something is wrong! In that case don’t use the downloaded tarball and contact the developers as described in Contact.

A CVS repository, where the development takes place, is also available. To stay up to date with the latest developments in the source tree, you can anonymously checkout the repository with the following command:

cvs -z9 -d:pserver:anonymous@cvs.savannah.gnu.org:/sources/ccd2cue co ccd2cue

Contact

You can get in touch with other users and the developers of this program subscribing to the mailing list. Anyone is welcome to join the list; to do so, visit the bug-ccd2cue web interface. You can use this list for all discussion, including asking for help and bug reporting, although the preferred method for reporting bugs is the dedicated bug tracking web interface described in Bug reporting. To post a message to all the list members, send email to bug-ccd2cue@gnu.org. To see the collection of prior postings to the list, visit the bug-ccd2cue archive.

If you feel somewhat chatty, eager for a somewhat more instantaneous response from community, you can join us on our friendly IRC channel: ‘irc://irc.freenode.net/ccd2cue’.

Bug reporting

If you come across some problem and need help you can contact the community as described in Contact. If you think you found a bug, but is not quite sure about it, you can instead ask for support on our support tracker. We will revise your post, advise you and take the appropriate measures. If you are confident you have found a bug, you can submit a bug report directly at our bug tracker. Please, when reporting a bug include enough information for the maintainers to reproduce the problem. Generally speaking, that means:

Contributing

This program is a collaborative effort and we encourage contributions from anyone and everyone — your help is very much appreciated. You can help in many ways:

You can join the development team to contribute code and documentation at the development page. Patches are most welcome, but contributed code should follow the GNU Coding Standards. If it doesn’t, we’ll need to find someone to fix the code before we can use it. It is also necessary that the contributor be willing to assign their copyright to the FSF, since the developers plan to make it officially part of the GNU operating system and they want FSF to enforce the program’s license. To get started hacking see how to hack.

Donating

If you find this program useful, please send a donation to its developers to support their work. If you use this program at your workplace, please suggest that the company make a donation. We appreciate contributions of any size – donations enable us to spend more time working on this package, and help cover our infrastructure expenses.

If you’d like to make a donation of any value, please send it to the following Bitcoin address:

12sKDaBNYekQuRPdrpnbUL4YRDKrzMnY62

Since we aren’t a tax-exempt organization, we can’t offer you a tax deduction, but for all donations over 0.05 BTC, we’d be happy to recognize your contribution on the donors page and on DONORS file for the next release.

We are also happy to consider making particular improvements or changes, or giving specific technical assistance, in return for a substantial donation over 0.5 BTC. If you would like to discuss this possibility, write to us at ccd2cue@gnu.org.

Another possibility is to pay a software maintenance fee. Again, write to us about this at ccd2cue@gnu.org to discuss how much you want to pay and how much maintenance we can offer in return.

Thanks for your support!

Hacking

The development sources are available through CVS at Savannah:

https://savannah.gnu.org/cvs/?group=ccd2cue

If you are getting the sources from CVS (or change configure.ac), you’ll need to have Automake, Autoconf and Gettext installed to (re)build. You’ll also need help2man. All of these programs are available from https://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/.

After getting the CVS sources, and installing the tools above, you can run ./bootstrap to do a fresh build. After that first time, running make should suffice. See file INSTALL.

When modifying the sources, or making a distribution, more is needed, as follows:

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