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GNU gcal

Introducing Gcal

Gcal is a program for calculating and printing calendars. Gcal displays hybrid and proleptic Julian and Gregorian calendar sheets, respectively for one month, three months, or a whole year. It also displays eternal holiday lists for many countries around the globe, and features a very powerful creation of fixed date liststhat can be used for reminding purposes. Gcal can calculate various astronomical data and times of the Sun and the Moon for pleasure at any location, precisely enough for most civil purposes. Gcal supports some other calendar systems, for example, the Chinese and Japanese calendars, the Hebrew calendar, and the civil Islamic calendar, too.

Downloads

You can get gcal here.

Documentation

A manual is available in several formats. You may also find more information about gcal by looking at your local documentation. For example, you might try info gcal at the shell prompt.

Mailing lists

General discussion of these projects take place on the mailing list bug-gcal@gnu.org (it's not just for bug reports, despite the name). Feel free to subscribe or browse the archives.

To subscribe to the GNU gcal mailing list, either use the mailman web interface or send empty email with a Subject: header line of just subscribe to bug-gcal-request@gnu.org.

Found a bug? Have a suggestion? Please report it to the mailing list, trying to specify all the information that could be involved (platform, program version, and build tools version if building from source code). Please report both the behavior you expected to the actual behavior you observed.

Maintainer

The primary maintainer of GNU gcal is Giuseppe Scrivano. We thank the Hitflip team for the gcal logos.

About GNU and the GNU Philosophy

The GNU Project was launched in 1984 to develop a complete Unix-like operating system which is free software—free as in freedom, not price. Its principal sponsor is the Free Software Foundation.

The free software philosophy is the root and motivation of the guidelines and goals of the whole free software movement, a worldwide community.

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Please send FSF & GNU inquiries to <gnu@gnu.org>. There are also other ways to contact the FSF.
Please send broken links and other corrections or suggestions to <bug-gcal@gnu.org>.

Copyright 2009 Free Software Foundation, Inc.

Verbatim copying and distribution of this entire article are permitted worldwide, without royalty, in any medium, provided this notice, and the copyright notice, are preserved.

Updated: $Date: 2013/03/16 23:01:22 $