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Apple's Operating Systems Are Malware

Other examples of proprietary malware

Malware means software designed to function in ways that mistreat or harm the user. (This does not include accidental errors.) This page explains how the software in Apple's computer products are malware.

Malware and nonfree software are two different issues. The difference between free software and nonfree software is in whether the users have control of the program or vice versa. It's not directly a question of what the program does when it runs. However, in practice nonfree software is often malware, because the developer's awareness that the users would be powerless to fix any malicious functionalities tempts the developer to impose some.

If you know of an example that ought to be in this page but isn't here, please write to <webmasters@gnu.org> to inform us. Please include the URL of a trustworthy reference or two to serve as specific substantiation.

Type of malware

Apple Back Doors

Apple Censorship

Apple mainly uses iOS, which is a typical jail, to impose censorship through the Apple Store. Please refer to the Apple Jails section for more information.

Apple Deception

Apple DRM

Apple Incompatibility

In this section, we list characteristics of Apple programs that block or hinder users from switching to any alternative program—and, in particular, from switching to free software which can liberate the device the software runs on.

Apple Insecurity

These bugs are/were not intentional, so unlike the rest of the file they do not count as malware. We mention them to refute the supposition that prestigious proprietary software doesn't have grave bugs.

Apple Jails

iOS, the operating system of the Apple iThings, is the prototype of a jail. It was Apple that introduced the practice of designing general purpose computers with censorship of application programs.

Here is an article about the code signing that the iThings use to lock up the user.

Curiously, Apple is beginning to allow limited passage through the walls of the iThing jail: users can now install apps built from source code, provided the source code is written in Swift. Users cannot do this freely because they are required to identify themselves. Here are details. While this is a crack in the prison walls, it is not big enough to mean that the iThings are no longer jails.

Examples of censorship by Apple jails

Apple Pressuring

Proprietary companies can take advantage of their customers by imposing arbitrary limits to their use of the software. This section reports examples of hard sell and other unjust commercial tactics by Apple.

Apple Sabotage

These are situations in which Apple employs its power over users to directly intervene in ways that harm them or block their work.

Apple Surveillance

Apple Tyrants

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